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The Fijian Government in 2011 launched the Fijian Made-Buy Fijian Campaign. The Campaign is a national branding initiative of the Fijian Government. The Campaign promotes Fijian products and services in the domestic, regional and international markets. The Campaign is spearheaded by the Ministry, to promote and raise the profile of Fijian made products through branding and marketing strategies.

This Campaign supports Government’s policy aimed at promoting the production and consumption of items, which can be produced or grown in Fiji. The overall objectives of this Campaign are to:

  • build a sense of loyalty amongst the Fijians to buy locally produced products to assist employment generation and the expansion of the manufacturing and agricultural sectors;
  • reduce the import bill and improve Fiji’s balance of payment; and
  • position Fijian made products in the international markets to promote and strengthen our exports.

www.fijianmade.gov.fj

1. Interpretation

For the purposes of this criteria, unless the context otherwise requires –

Substantial transformation” means Imported inputs or two or more items, each coded of four digits on the Harmonised Commodity Description and Coding System which upon manufacturing or processing will result in the finished good that is substantially different from the original by virtue of a change to the classification of the goods in its first four digits for the Fiji Standard Tariff based on the Harmonised Description and Coding System.

2. Conditions for Use of Emblems

The Licensee shall only use the emblem with one or more of the following representations if the conditions set out hereafter are satisfied.

(a) “Fijian Product

i) all significant components must originate from Fiji; and

ii) all, or significantly all, processes involved in the production or manufacture of the goods must be conducted in Fiji.

(b) “Fijian Made

i) The good must be substantially transformed through a change in tariff heading.

(c) “Fijian Sewn

i) The good must be substantially transformed through a change in tariff heading.

(d) “Fijian Assembled” or “Fijian Packed” or “Fijian Designed

i) Processes such as preservations, cutting, packaging, labeling, mixing and assembly.

(e) “Fijian Crafted

i) All handicraft which use as its major components locally sourced materials that are weaved, crafted, and stringed to depict authentic Fijian craft.

(f) “Fijian Grown

i) All products that are obtained in an unprocessed state such as fruit and vegetables and products harvested and obtained by hunting and fishing.

(g) “Fijian Organic”

i) All produce or products grown or processed in Fiji are to be certified with the Pacific Organic Guarantee Scheme standards or any international standard.

Fijian Product

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Product”:

  1. All significant components must originate from Fiji; and
  2. All, or virtually all, processes involved in the production or manufacture of the goods must have happened in Fiji.

Fijian Made

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Made”:

  1. The good must be substantially transformed through a change in tariff heading: 
    1. The definition to guide the use of this representation is as stipulated in the Customs (Budget Amendment) Decree 2010 which defines substantial transformation as: “Imported inputs of two or more items, each coded of four digits on the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System which upon manufacturing or processing will result in a finished good that is substantially different from the original by virtue of a change to the classification of the goods in its first four digits of the Fiji Standard Tariff based on the Harmonized Description and Coding System”.
    2. This is designed to include producers and manufacturers who rely on imported inputs /raw materials for the manufacture/processing of their goods and products. A classic example here is biscuits, of which its inputs namely flour, colouring, etc. are imported under a different tariff heading than that of the final product, biscuits.
    3. For those wishing to export ‘Fijian Made’ under PICTA, 40% value-added criteria will need to be met of which FRCA has the mechanism in place to verify this.

Fijian Sewn

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Sewn”:

  1. The good must be substantially transformed through a change in tariff heading.
    1. The definition to guide the use of this representation is the same as that of B. above, however, this is specifically for use by large garment manufacturers and microentrepreneur s that run small tailoring and sewing businesses and distinguishes them from those that will use the ‘Fijian Made’ logo.
    2. For those wishing to export under PICTA, 40% value-added criteria will need to be met and those wishing to export under SPARTECA, 50% value-added criteria will need to be met. FRCA has existing mechanisms in place to cater for those manufacturers already exporting under these two arrangements.

Fijian Assembled or Fijian Packed or Fijian Designed

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Assembled” or “Fijian Packed” or “Fijian Designed”:

  1. Insufficient working processes such as preservations, simple operations such as cutting, packaging, labelling, simple mixing operation, simple assembly, and slaughter of animals are involved.
    1. This definition is designed to include those that carry out minimal processes which do not substantially alter the original imported product and includes processes such as freezing, canning or simple preserving processes associated with packaging, simple mixing or blending of food ingredients, where the resulting product is not substantially different to the different ingredients, Juicing – extractions of juice from fruit, Homogenization, Seasoning, Marinating, Coating, Curing, Roasting or toasting of coffee beans, nuts or seeds, etc.
    2. In such cases and to avoid making misleading representations about the origin of the product, explicit terms such as ‘assembled’` packed’ or` designed’ should be used by the manufacturers.

Fijian Crafted

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Crafted”:

  1. All handicraft which uses as its major components locally sourced materials that are weaved, crafted and strung to depict authentic Fijian craft.
    1. The litmus test here is the proof of sourcing all major components locally. For example, a woven basket might contain imported components such as strings, buttons, etc. but the major component sourced locally is the raw material used to make the basket.
    2. This is designed to differentiate authentic Fijian craft from handicraft made in other countries and ones that use largely imported components and is specifically targeted for micro and small entrepreneurs who cater for the tourist market.

Fijian Grown

For the use of the emblem to be used in conjunction with the representation “Fijian Grown”:

  1. All products that are obtained in an unprocessed state such as fruit and vegetables and products harvested and obtained by hunting and fishing.
    1. The definition used here is taken from the definition of ‘wholly obtained’ used in trade agreements.
    2. In the context of the Campaign, the definition is targeted for use by our farmers and fishermen to raise the profile of our local produce.

To obtain a license to use the emblem, you must make an application to the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Tourism on the prescribed application form.

A fee of $50 VIP per application is applicable to a single company. Micro and small enterprises are exempted from paying the application fee.

The application form is available from this link and at the Ministry Offices in Suva, Lautoka and Labasa. The application form can be physically submitted to the Ministry.

All applications undergo an assessment by the Compliance Committee to verify if the application meets the compliance criteria and adhere with the statuary requirements.

The Compliance Committee Members comprises of representatives from key agencies to validate and provide technical advice to the Ministry on all applications. The Compliance Committee submit their recommendation to the Ministry on each application. The Compliance Committee Members comprises of:

  1. Fiji Revenue and Customs Service;
  2. Ministry of Health and Medical Services;
  3. Ministry of Employment, Productivity and Industrial Relations;
  4. Ministry of Agriculture;
  5. Department of National Trade Measurement and Standards;
  6. Fijian Competition and Consumer Commission;
  7. Fiji Arts Council; and
  8. Other Agencies co-opted where necessary based on the nature of the application.

If the application is in order with all relevant documents provided, the license is granted within 3 weeks of the application.

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